British Airways Grounds Flights Following Global IT Problems [Updated]

It’s a holiday weekend, but British Airways passengers aren’t getting the relaxing time off that they’d hoped for. Following a “major IT system failure” that “is causing very severe disruption to our flight operations worldwide,” the airline says that flights will have to be grounded until the problems are resolved.

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Study Identifies the Likely Genetic Mutation Responsible for Smooshed-Faced Dogs

Scientists have long understood that dogs with flat faces like pugs and bulldogs are the result of out-of-control selective breeding. But they’ve yet to discover the exact genetic mutation that’s responsible for the physical traits of these dogs. A new study has gone a long way towards finding the answer and could have implications for the health of these beleaguered canines.

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4 MOUTHWATERING MEMORIAL DAY RECIPES FROM CHEF MARIO BATALI

If you’re a regular reader (and if you’re not – hi! Come, hang out. You’ll like us, honestly. We’re friendly and we smell good), you’ll know that we’re pretty into our food here. That’s why we got celebrity chef Mario Batali to whip us up a few dishes to try out over the Memorial Day weekend. But wait! There’s more to it.

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Short Film: Agent 327

Agent 327 thus feels like a charming throwback to the recent past, when animation schools were routinely graduating tradesfolk prepared to join the ranks at Pixar, Disney, or Dreamworks. It is a slick, action-comedy with a bright and conventional aesthetic that happens to be impeccably executed. If you miss the days when French schools were pumping out charmingly broad slapstick work like Oktapodi several times a year, you’ll get a kick out of this short, 4min piece.

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Scientists are using gene editing to try to slow cancer growth

When you think of gene editing technologies like CRISPR, you might imagine editing genes that relate to height, eye color, or our risk of getting certain diseases. But in truth, our DNA and RNA are full of countless proteins whose jobs have tiny yet important effects on our health. Some, for example, are heavily involved in the cell cycle, which regulates how all cells grow and divide—including cancer cells. A group of researchers out of the University of Rochester Medical Center recently used the CRISPR gene editing technique to try to eliminate one of the key proteins that allow cancer cells to proliferate out of control. While it’s just a first-of-its-kind study, the researchers think that in the future, it could be incorporated into a therapy to treat the disease.

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