7 Ancient Mysteries Archaeologists Will Solve This Century

When the National Geographic Society awarded its first archaeology grant to Hiram Bingham in 1912, the archaeologist headed off to Machu Picchu with one of the most advanced pieces of technology at the time: a Kodak panoramic camera. More than a hundred years later, archaeologists have a staggering array of technological tools to employ, from remote-sensing equipment that allows us to “see” beyond the visual bandwidth to computers so powerful that they can process in a second what it would take humans thousands of years to do.

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The Mechanical Art of Seduction: Richard Mille RM 69 Erotic Tourbillon

When discussing historical figures who shocked and scandalized their era’s societal norms, Swiss watchmakers do not immediately come to most people’s minds. However, the history of horology is rife with “erotic timepieces” — watches that depicted sexually suggestive scenes on their dials, often using mechanical automaton figures to simulate acts of libertine pleasure that would surely have shocked those in polite society. Some such timepieces, which were often banned and confiscated due to their breaking with contemporary moral, religious, and political customs, have survived to this day as rare collectors’ pieces.

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First Lieutenant Calvin Spann, Original Tuskegee Airman, Has Died at 90

First Lieutenant Calvin Spann, one of the original Tuskegee airmen serving in World War II, died Sunday at the age of 90.

Spann, born in Rutherford, New Jersey, was inspired to fly at a young age by the aviation comic book strip, Smilin’ Jack.

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5 Produce Secrets Supermarkets Don’t Want You To Know

  • The Right Time to Buy Apples (It’s Not When You Think)
    Over the last few years, while many of us have been trying to buy more seasonally, Lori Taylor, the produce-industry expert who writes The Produce Mom blog gladly buys fruit she knows has been in storage, or on a ship, for a few months. She didn’t hesitate to purchase Honeycrisp apples when she saw them in stores in June, even though she knew they were grown late last year. Taylor explains that such produce (most often apples, bananas, kiwifruit, persimmons, tomatoes, cantaloupes and avocados) is stored in climate-controlled rooms and has had all the oxygen sucked out of it to drastically slow down the fruit-ripening process. “[The fruit] just goes to sleep,” she says, so its “season” is extended — a perk for those who are open to buying, say, apples in June.

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Serena Williams Beats Venus, Advances to U.S. Open Semifinals

Meeting for the 27th time as professionals (and 5000th+ time overall)Serena and Venus Williams faced-off in the U.S. Open quarterfinals tonight. The winner, for the 16th time in their official sibling rivalry, was Serena which keeps her hopes of claiming a fourth-straight Open title alive. She dispatched her 23-seeded sister in three sets (6-2, 1-6, 6-3) and, as she does seemingly every time out, continued to cement her status as the No. 1 women’s tennis player alive.

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