MUSEUM OF FOOD AND DRINK EXPLORES THE $25 BILLION FLAVOR INDUSTRY

Before this week, the Museum of Food and Drink was largely conceptual. In the mind of Dave Arnold, an author, food history obsessive, and the founder of groundbreaking New York City bar Booker & Dax, MOFAD was not only already built, it had already begun planning future exhibits that could tour the country and enchant the public.

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Android and Chrome OS may be combined as early as next year

For years, people have wondered if Google would merge its Android and Chrome operating systems, and the company has steadfastly held to them important but distinctpieces of its strategy. That might be changing: The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google has been working for two years to merge Chrome OS and Android. The results of that unified operating system is expected to be officially released to the public in 2017, but we may see an early version as soon as next year.

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OPUS 14

After a hiatus of two years, Harry Winston and the Opus are back on the dance floor with a Rock ‘N’ Roll timepiece.

They are calling it the “Jukebox on your wrist” as it has a stack of four disks with different time displays — local time, GMT time, date and a star bearing the signature of Mr. Harry Winston — that slide out like vinyl records in a jukebox on demand.

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Popular movie posters get animated with the actual scene from the movie

There’s a whole lot of fun in this project by Pablo Fernandez Eyre: famous movie posters turn into moving pictures with the help of the actual scene from the movie itself. It’s like if the movie posters were GIFs, you get to see what led up to and what happened after the scene they took the movie poster from.

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7 Little Know Facts About the First African-American Built Neighborhood in the United States

The Creation of Orange Mound 

In 1890, white developer E. E. Meacham purchased land from the Deaderick family, plantation owners in Memphis Tennessee.  He sold lots to African-Americans for less than $100. The subdivision was named Orange Mound and became the first all Black community in the U.S., specifically built for Black people. According to Laura Nickas for Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, “The new neighborhood bordered the Mid-South Fairgrounds to the southeast while a stronghold of the KKK bordered the fairgrounds just to the west.”

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