New Study Suggests Too Much Social Media Could Make You Feel Lonelier

Here’s a study that seems kind of surprising at first, but actually kind of makes sense seeing as how creeping on your friends and tweeting “F*** YOU” at politicians you don’t like never seemed like it would be all that healthy to begin with.

Here’s a study that seems kind of surprising at first, but actually kind of makes sense seeing as how creeping on your friends and tweeting “F*** YOU” at politicians you don’t like never seemed like it would be all that healthy to begin with.

Back in 2014, Primack, along with several other researchers, asked almost 2,000 U.S. adults between the ages of 19 and 32 about the frequency with which they use the 11 top social media platforms (YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.) What they found was that the shut-ins who were on social media for two or more hours per day were twice as likely to be socially isolated as their lesser shut-in peers who were on social media for half-an-hour or less per day. On top of that, participants who were on social media 58+ times per week were three times as likely to be lacking in social contact as people who were on nine times or less per week.

This, of course, presents a chicken or the egg problem.

“We do not yet know which came first–the social media use or the perceived social isolation,” said researcher Elizabeth Miller. “It’s possible that young adults who initially felt socially isolated turned to social media. Or it could be that their increased use of social media somehow led to feeling isolated from the real world. It also could be a combination of both. But even if the social isolation came first, it did not seem to be alleviated by spending time online, even in purportedly social situations.”

The findings led them to a number of theories, some of which include: browsing social media takes up the time that could be spent having real human interactions. That social media makes people feel like they’re missing out, like when they see the picture of an event they weren’t invited to. And that looking at other people’s profiles can inspire jealousy because everyone always makes their lives look so glamorous on Instagram, Facebook, etc.

Both Primack and Miller believe doctors should ask patients about their social media usage, and that they should advise their patients reduce their time on those platforms if they’re feeling socially deprived. Also, like always with these damn studies, they said that more research is necessary to fully understand the issue.

source: complex.com BY

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s