Tag Archives: Native Americans

Record-Breaking Heat in Alaska Wreaks Havoc on Communities and Ecosystems

Alaska in March is supposed to be cold. Along the north and west coasts, the ocean should be frozen farther than the eye can see. In the state’s interior, rivers should be locked in ice so thick that they double as roads for snowmobiles and trucks. And where I live, near Anchorage in south-central Alaska, the snowpack should be deep enough to support skiing for weeks to come. But this year, a record-breaking heatwave upended norms and had us basking in comfortable—but often unsettling—warmth. Continue reading Record-Breaking Heat in Alaska Wreaks Havoc on Communities and Ecosystems

Enslaved Black People: The Part of the Trail of Tears Narrative No One Told You About

Contrary to the popular historical narrative, the Union’s effort to rein in the Confederacy and end the secessionist military rebellion now known as the Civil War was incomplete upon the iconic April 9, 1865, surrender of Robert E. Lee at a Virginia courthouse in Appomattox. While ending the conflict in Virginia, the legendary courthouse meeting between Lee and Union General Ulysses S. Grant prompted a series of subsequent surrenders in numerous Southern states and Western territories over the following months. On June 23, a full two-and-a-half months after Appomattox, the war finally came to its conclusion at the Doaksville settlement in present-day Oklahoma with the surrender of Stand Watie, the last Confederate general to lay down his arms. Continue reading Enslaved Black People: The Part of the Trail of Tears Narrative No One Told You About

The Part of the Trail of Tears Narrative No One Told You About

Contrary to the popular historical narrative, the Union’s effort to rein in the Confederacy and end the secessionist military rebellion now known as the Civil War was incomplete upon the iconic April 9, 1865, surrender of Robert E. Lee at a Virginia courthouse in Appomattox. While ending the conflict in Virginia, the legendary courthouse meeting between Lee and Union General Ulysses S. Grant prompted a series of subsequent surrenders in numerous Southern states and Western territories over the following months. On June 23, a full two-and-a-half months after Appomattox, the war finally came to its conclusion at the Doaksville settlement in present-day Oklahoma with the surrender of Stand Watie, the last Confederate general to lay down his arms. Continue reading The Part of the Trail of Tears Narrative No One Told You About

Discovery of Unknown Ancient Population Changes Our Understanding of How North America Was Settled

She died 11,500 years ago at the tender age of six weeks in what is now the interior of Alaska. Dubbed “Sunrise Girl-child” by the local indigenous people, the remains of the Ice Age infant—uncovered at an archaeological dig in 2013—contained traces of DNA, allowing scientists to perform a full genomic analysis. Incredibly, this baby girl belonged to a previously unknown population of ancient Native Americans—a discovery that’s changing what we know about the continent’s first people.

Continue reading Discovery of Unknown Ancient Population Changes Our Understanding of How North America Was Settled

Obama Protects 1.65 Million Acres of Native American Land

President Obama has designated 1.65 million acres in Southeastern Utah and Nevada as National Monuments, protecting the land from private development and granting the federal government broad control to protect it. The new monument includes Bears Ears Buttes in Utah, and Gold Butte near Las Vegas.

Continue reading Obama Protects 1.65 Million Acres of Native American Land