Tag Archives: tomorrow

Bioengineers 3D print complex vascular networks

Bioengineers are one step closer to 3D printing organs and tissues. A team led by Rice University and the University of Washington have developed a tool to 3D print complex and “exquisitely entangled” vascular networks. These mimic the body’s natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other fluids, and they will be essential for artificial organs.

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Ion-powered aircraft flies with no moving parts

As clean as electric aircraft can be, there’s still one kind of pollution they still produce: noise. Even that might go away before long, though. MIT researchers have successfully flown an ionic wind-powered aircraft that doesn’t use any moving parts. The 16-foot wide machine stays aloft by charging wires with a high enough voltage (40,000V) that they strip negatively-charged electrons from air molecules, which are promptly attracted to negative electrodes at the back of the aircraft. The collisions from that newly-formed ionic wind create the thrust needed to keep the vehicle airborne.

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MIT built a health-tracking sensor that can ‘see’ through walls

An MIT professor has built a prototype device that can wirelessly track your health — even through walls — using a mix of radio signals and machine learning. Dina Katabi’s gadget resembles a WiFi router and is designed to sit in your pad and monitor your breathing, heart rate, sleep, gait, and more as you go about your day. It’s already doing that in over 200 homes around the US of both healthy people and those with Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression, and pulmonary diseases.

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NASA’s terrifying visualization of atmospheric aerosols

Heatwaves, hurricanes and other extreme weather might be the “face of climate change,” but it’s not the only sign. A grim new visualization from NASA shows another problem caused indirectly by global warming: airborne particles and droplets. These “aerosols,” shown on a single day on August 23rd, come from dust, volcanic ash and other sources. They’re particularly brutal this year because of fires in California, British Columbia and the southern part of Africa. Continue reading NASA’s terrifying visualization of atmospheric aerosols

Tech giants discussed midterm election concerns with US government

This week, The New York Times reported that tech companies met with US government officials to discuss security and possible foreign influence around the 2018 midterm elections. Representatives from Amazon, Google, Twitter, Oath, Microsoft, Snap and Apple met at Facebook’s headquarters in California. Christopher Krebs, an under secretary for the Department of Homeland Security, and an unnamed representative from the FBI’s foreign influence task force were present at the meeting.

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FDA approves its first marijuana-derived drug

In a nationwide first, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized the use of ‘Epidiolex’, a marijuana derivative which will be used to treat rare forms of epilepsy. Epidiolex — also known as cannabidiol or CBD — is a highly-purified version of the many psychoactive compounds found in marijuana, and does not result in a high.

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Scientists create ultra-thin membrane that turns eyes into lasers

It will still be a while before scientists are able to harness Superman-like laser vision, but the technology is now closer than ever before thanks to a new development from the University of St Andrews. The team there have created an ultra-thin membrane laser using organic semiconductors, which is for the first time compatible with the requirements for safe operation in the human eye. Even though the membrane is super thin and flexible, it’s durable, and will retain its optical properties even after several months spent attached to another object, such as a bank note or, more excitingly, a contact lens.

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