Tag Archives: tomorrow

Elon Musk’s Neuralink hopes to put sensors in human brains next year

While we wait for Neuralink to present the progress it’s made over the last couple of years in brain-computer interface technology, the New York Times has already published information from an early briefing and it’s stuff that’s straight out of science fiction. The Elon Musk-backed company claims its “sewing machine-like” robot can implant threads deep into a human brain. Continue reading Elon Musk’s Neuralink hopes to put sensors in human brains next year

SpaceX plans to launch Starship’s first commercial flight in 2021

While we haven’t seen the Starship fly yet — SpaceX just got done with its test firings and short “hops” back in April — we might not have to wait that long for its first commercial flight. According to SpaceX VP of commercial sales Jonathan Hofeller, the company is hoping to send it to space for its first commercial mission in 2021. He revealed at an event in Indonesia that SpaceX is already in discussions with three different customers for that flight, all telecom companies likely looking to send satellites to orbit.

Continue reading SpaceX plans to launch Starship’s first commercial flight in 2021

NASA will study solar weather in two new missions

Solar winds are no threat to people on Earth, but can pose a danger to astronauts and spacecraft. NASA has selected two new missions that aims to better our understanding of how the Sun drives extreme space weather. The first mission, Polarimeter to Unify the Corona and Heliosphere (or PUNCH) will consist of four suitcase-shaped satellites that will track solar wind as it leaves the sun. The second, Tandem Reconnection and Cusp Electrodynamics Reconnaissance Satellites (or TRACERS) will use two spacecraft to study how magnetic fields around Earth interact with the Sun.

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Bioengineers 3D print complex vascular networks

Bioengineers are one step closer to 3D printing organs and tissues. A team led by Rice University and the University of Washington have developed a tool to 3D print complex and “exquisitely entangled” vascular networks. These mimic the body’s natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other fluids, and they will be essential for artificial organs.

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Ion-powered aircraft flies with no moving parts

As clean as electric aircraft can be, there’s still one kind of pollution they still produce: noise. Even that might go away before long, though. MIT researchers have successfully flown an ionic wind-powered aircraft that doesn’t use any moving parts. The 16-foot wide machine stays aloft by charging wires with a high enough voltage (40,000V) that they strip negatively-charged electrons from air molecules, which are promptly attracted to negative electrodes at the back of the aircraft. The collisions from that newly-formed ionic wind create the thrust needed to keep the vehicle airborne.

Continue reading Ion-powered aircraft flies with no moving parts

MIT built a health-tracking sensor that can ‘see’ through walls

An MIT professor has built a prototype device that can wirelessly track your health — even through walls — using a mix of radio signals and machine learning. Dina Katabi’s gadget resembles a WiFi router and is designed to sit in your pad and monitor your breathing, heart rate, sleep, gait, and more as you go about your day. It’s already doing that in over 200 homes around the US of both healthy people and those with Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression, and pulmonary diseases.

Continue reading MIT built a health-tracking sensor that can ‘see’ through walls

NASA’s terrifying visualization of atmospheric aerosols

Heatwaves, hurricanes and other extreme weather might be the “face of climate change,” but it’s not the only sign. A grim new visualization from NASA shows another problem caused indirectly by global warming: airborne particles and droplets. These “aerosols,” shown on a single day on August 23rd, come from dust, volcanic ash and other sources. They’re particularly brutal this year because of fires in California, British Columbia and the southern part of Africa. Continue reading NASA’s terrifying visualization of atmospheric aerosols